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Car review: Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet

PUBLISHED: 10:11 21 March 2017 | UPDATED: 10:11 21 March 2017

'If you can live with it in winter, you’'ll love it in summer'

'If you can live with it in winter, you’'ll love it in summer'

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The first Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet is a soft-top for all seasons, writes motoring editor Andy Russell

'The C-Class Cabriolet is a genuine four-seater with adequate legroom and, even with the roof up, headroom in the back for average adults' 'The C-Class Cabriolet is a genuine four-seater with adequate legroom and, even with the roof up, headroom in the back for average adults'

Imagine you’re cocooned in bed under the duvet, but can’t put off any longer the need to get up in a cold bedroom. That was the feeling I had when I tested the new Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet. Every morning, if it wasn’t raining, it was coated in frost but I knew I’d have to drop the roof to test it. Not the ideal time of year for Mercedes to UK launch its first C-Class soft-top – the spiritual successor to its four-seater CLK rag-top. But if you can live with it in winter, you’ll love it in summer.

Blowing hot or cold?

I needn’t have worried. Taking advantage of a dry spell, with the highly-efficient heating cranked up, heated front seats and Airscarf swirling hot air round my neck from a slot in the seat back, I was toasty.

'The extra weight of bracing to make up for no rigid roof means the cabriolet is not quite as agile as the coupe, saloon or estate but the ride quality is still top-notch' 'The extra weight of bracing to make up for no rigid roof means the cabriolet is not quite as agile as the coupe, saloon or estate but the ride quality is still top-notch'

It’s easy to make the most of any break in the weather – flick one switch and the roof disappears quietly and smoothly under a flush-fitting panel – all very neat and tidy – in 24 seconds and at up to 30mph. Press another button and a little wind deflector rises on top of the front screen and a draught stopper behind the rear seats to minimise buffeting. Even at motorway speeds, it’s quiet enough to have a conversation.

Under the bonnet

My test car was fitted with the 2.1-l turbo diesel engine, now available with a nine-speed automatic gearbox that’s much slicker and quicker shifting than the seven-speed transmission. With the extra, closer ratios, you hardly feel it changing and it feels more responsive when kicked down for acceleration or you can use flappy paddles behind the steering wheel.

I was also happy with 50mpg overall and 55mpg on a run.

How it drives

The extra weight of bracing to make up for no rigid roof means the cabriolet is not quite as agile as the coupe, saloon or estate but the ride quality is still top-notch.

Despite the Sport tag, it’s not really sporty but goes round corners competently with a flat stance and feels well planted with enough feel from the steering to be involving, especially if you make use of the adjustable drive modes.

Space & comfort

The C-Class Cabriolet is a genuine four-seater with adequate legroom and, even with the roof up, headroom in the back for average adults. But six-footers might feel the squeeze on long journeys. You also need to be reasonably supple to get in and out of the back with the roof up.

As cabriolets go, it’s also got a decent boot, especially with the roof up and its storage compartment raised out of the way. I managed to stow a medium-sized suitcase at the back of the boot and four soft bags without clever packing or brute force! With the roof down, soft, squidgy bags are the best bet.

At the wheel

The C-Class is extremely comfortable, with good adjustment for the electrically-operated memory front seats and electric steering column. The downside is that on the left-hand side of the steering column there are now stalks for the indicator and headlight main beam, cruise control and speed limiter and a little one to adjust the steering wheel so it’s get a little busy.

The fascia looks classy and works well with a central controller between the front seats for most functions but the large screen perched on the dashboard looks like an afterthought.

Final say

I like a soft-top cabriolet because, even with the roof up, I want people to know I’m driving one. The C-Class Cabriolet is the best open-top four-seater I have driven. Even when the weather is bad, every cloud has a silver lining.

Fact file

Price: Mercedes-Benz C220d Sport Cabriolet automatic £40,425 (range from £36,545)

Engine: 2,143cc, 170hp, four-cylinder turbo diesel

Performance: 0-62mph 8.2 seconds; top speed 144mph

MPG: Urban 54.3; extra urban 65.7; combined 61.4

CO2 emissions: 121g/km

Benefit-in-kind tax rate: 23 per cent

Insurance group: 36 (out of 50)

Warranty: Three years, unlimited mileage

Size: L 4,686mm; W (incl door mirrors) 2,016mm; H 1,409mm

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